A Quick Guide to Singapore Go-Karting Tracks

Contrary to popular belief, motorsport isn’t a pastime only for elites. Karting, or carting, is the first rung on the ladder that leads to F1, and it’s an activity that the entire family can take part in. Having visited the four permanent karting tracks that have sprung up around Singapore, I have summarised the differences between each below, and I can say that local petrolheads have never been this spoilt for choice.

Updated: May 26, 2019 @ 8:31 PM

Singapore go-karting requirements

  • You need to be tall enough to reach the pedals with your feet
  • Covered shoes, please
  • No loose clothing or untied long hair
  • To drive the faster karts, bring your driving license (foreign ones are accepted)
  • As a courtesy to other users, wear the balaclava or shower cap you’re given before putting on the helmet
  • These are not bumper cars, so don’t punt other people off
  • Most facilities won’t let you drive on a wet track unless you come with your own kart and grooved tyres. Then again, you wouldn’t need this blog if you own these

KF1 Karting

KF1 Circuit

Opened: 2014
Track location (nearest MRT station): Turf Club Avenue (Kranji)
Track length: 960 m
Turns: 18
Good lap time: 1 min
Live timing: Yes
Normal Fun Kart session fees: S$28 (off-peak) – S$35 (peak), S$18 for under-21s with proof of age
Advanced Fun Kart session fees (driving license required): S$35 (off-peak) – S$45 (peak), S$22 for under-21s with proof of age
A one-time registration fee of S$5 applies for first-time visitors
Opening days and hours: Tue to Sun 1 p.m. – 10 p.m.
Racing simulator: No
Food: Podium Club cafe, food court and shops at Kranji station
Merchandise shop: Yes
Professional Races: Yes
Race kart storage: Yes
Pros: The opportunity to drive on a technical circuit designed by F1 circuit specialists Tilke, a well-stocked merchandise store
Cons: No simulators for waiting out the rain.
Website

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Read my review of the KF1 circuit here.

KF1 Arena

KF1 Arena karting track Singapore

KF1 acquired the site of the former Kartright Speedway and created a new track that opened in late 2017. Stay tuned for my review!

Opened: 2017
Track location (nearest MRT station): Jurong West (Joo Koon)
Track length: 780 m
Turns: 14
Good lap time: 45 seconds
Live timing: No
Normal Fun Kart session fees: S$22 (off-peak) – S$28 (peak), S$15 for under-21s with proof of age
Advanced Fun Kart session fees (driving license required): S$28 (off-peak) – S$35 (peak), S$18 for under-21s with proof of age
A one-time registration fee of S$5 applies for first-time visitors
Opening days and hours: Mon to Sun 12 noon to 9 p.m.
Racing simulator: No
Food: Hawker centre at Arena Country Club
Merchandise shop: No
Professional Races: Yes
Race kart storage: Yes
Pros: Two-seater karts are available, a good view of the track from the rooftop
Cons: No races on fun karts that are open to the public
Website

The Karting Arena

The Karting Arena

Opened: 2015
Track location (nearest MRT station): Bukit Timah (Sixth Avenue)
Track length: 500 m
Turns: 11
Good lap time: 35 seconds
Live timing: Yes
Karts: Single-seater electric karts
Fun Kart session fees: S$20 – S$32 for members, S$30 – S$45 for non-members (Driving license needed for faster karts)
Opening days and hours: Tue to Sun 10 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Racing simulator: Yes
Food: Shops at The Grandstand
Merchandise shop: No
Professional Races: No
Race kart storage: No
Pros: Most centrally-located of the three go-kart tracks
Cons: Not a professional racing facility, spectators can only watch from behind the pitlane
Website

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Maximum Drift

Maximum Drift Orto Yishun Singapore

Opened: 2016
Track location (nearest MRT station): ORTO Yishun (Khatib)
Track length: ?
Turns: 10
Good lap time: 35 seconds
Live timing: No
Karts: Single-seater electric drift karts
Fun Kart session fees: S$15 for members, S$18 – S$20 for non-members
Opening days and hours: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri 3 p.m. – 9 p.m.; Sat, Sun, public holidays 10 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Racing simulator: No
Food: Restaurants and stands around ORTO
Merchandise shop: No
Professional Races: No
Race kart storage: No
Pros: The only drift kart venue in Singapore, inexpensive, no license needed at all
Cons: Not the same kind of karting as the others, clearly
Website

Read my review of Maximum Drift here.
Here’s what else you can do in the rest of Singapore and what karting on the streets of Tokyo is like.

This post was first published on 30 Dec 2015